TREKKING PEAKS FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Trekking peaks are an ideal way of breaking your adventure trip away from a standard hike or trek, to something which requires more skill and often also height in terms of altitude. There are numerous smaller peaks in the Himalayas that can be successfully climbed by people without much prior experience of climbing.

The government of Nepal has designated the term 'Trekking Peak' to 18 Peaks, which can now be climbed once you have a permit via the Nepal Mountaineering Association. The category was created by the Nepal Mountaineering association as an intermediate stage between hiking and mountaineering. The climbs are of an intermediate level yet despite their names, are certainly not just an extension of a walking trek. Tackling a 'trekking peak' should not be undertaken lightly as they require physical stamina, mental focus and require basic mountain climbing skills. On these treks, you will be trekking and climbing above the snow line using ice axe, crampons, ropes and other climbing equipment. Prior experience though not essential, is certainly an advantage.

Get answers to frequently asked questions about trekking peaks.

Yes they do. The peaks are listed under three climbing grades: 'F' (Facil) for easy, 'PD' (Peu Dificile) for intermediate, and 'AD' (Assez Difficile) for difficult.
The best time to climb the over 600m trekking peaks is March to May and September to November. The latter months are colder but also give way to more stable snow conditions.
Each trekking peak is a different duration. Island Peak as an example can be added on as a 5 day extension, whereas others take a lot longer.
You need to be in good physical shape and able to sustain extended periods of hard climbing, as summit day can be up to 12 hours long. You should start training a good 4-6 months prior to the trip with extended periods of cardio workouts and hill walking. Although you will receive training at the peak on using mountaineering equipment, you should also take a course in basic climbing skills so that you are familiar with the rope work before you arrive. 
The routes are not clearly market given that most of the ascent takes place above the snow line. Below the snow many sections are rocky and steep and can  be very slippery at times. Some places are more like a scramble. Once above the snow line you will encounter ice and snow and rock.
This really depends on the operator you travel through. The Park authorities do not ask for any medical information on the climbers when permits are purchased. Some operators request the clients complete a medical form, others do not. We require that all of our clients complete a medical form and based on the answers, we may request a letter from your medical practitioner. People suffering with conditions such as severe asthma e.g. should not climb. Regardless, anyone attempting the climb, or any climb for that matter, should ensure that they are medically fit, and convey any medical conditions to the operator they book with.
This is one of the most often asked questions - "how will I cope with the altitude". To be honest, this is an 'unknown' factor as no-one can predict how your body will cope at altitude. People who have been to altitude many times in the past without problems, may on one climb suddenly develop problems. There are many factors that play a role. The only way to help combat this, is to take all of the necessary precautions, and walk slowly, acclimatise correctly, don't ascent too quickly and drink plenty of water.

Before setting out we will provide you with a full equipment list. However there are certain basics for all peaks over 6000m.

Plastic boots are essential and should be the double boot (with a soft inner and hard plastic shell), as temperatures can drop to below -20C. If you plan on buying these before you leave then make sure you can wear a double layer sock in them with plenty of room for your toes to move. Otherwise you can rent them in Nepal as they are an expensive item to buy.

Crampons are worn with the plastic boot as either a strap on or clip on depending on the type. You will use these for the  majority of the time you spend on the glacier and summit day. Again, these can be rented.

A climbing harness is the next essential item which you will wear over your trekking pants.

Unfortunately this is something every trekker has to consider.  Anything from a stomach bug to altitude sickness can quickly stop a trekker in their tracks. If you are ill and need to turn back or even too tired to continue, a porter will walk off the mountain with you and your gear. If you require emergency evacuation, this will be contingent on your insurance cover. It is for this reason that insurance cover for this purpose is mandatory.

Yes you do. We (Nomadic Adventures) do not allow anyone to climb with us unless they have adequate travel insurance. Adequate, means you must be covered for

1) trekking or hiking - this may sound strange, but many insurance list that as an exclusion.

2) altitudes over 6,000 meters. Most travel insurance providers do not include this under their standard cover and often limit it to 3500m or less.

3) Sprains strains and physiotherapy - yes, many insurers exclude this, though ironically, this is what you will most likely need cover for. 4) personal accident - this is the horrible part of insurance. Yes, you need to be covered in the case of death. We are often told by clients - "if anything happens to me, just leave me there." It is not that simply. Bodies need to be brought home or laid to rest overseas, and this can run into thousands of dollars, creating a huge burden on family members.

We will assist in helping you provide good cover.

Those who have trekked in the Himalayas, know that the porters are the heart and soul of your trek. Without their hard work and strength we would not be able to fully experience the magnificence of Everest. IPPG aims to improve safety and health for porters working in the mountains for the trekking industry worldwide. We work to eradicate avoidable illness, injury and death. We do this by raising awareness of the issues among travel companies, guides, trek leaders, sirdars (porters foremen), and trekkers.

 

  Trekking Peak query

Book your Trekking Peak
Other Treks in Nepal
 17 day tour
  Start point is from Lukla
  Altitude of 5495m
  A more popular trekking route
  Wonderful mix of culture and scenery
  Breathtaking views of Everest and surrounding peaks
  Same ascent and descent route
  Can be combined with Island Peak
Everest Base Camp Trek Itinerary
 15 day tour
 Start point is from Pokhara
 Altitude of 4130m
 Not as steep at Everest base camp trek
 Lower average altitude than base camp Everest
 Several route options
 Choice of base camp or circuit trek
 Stunning expansive mountain vistas
Annapurna Base Camp Itinerary
 23 day tour
  Start point is from Lukla
  Altitude of 5495m
  Less busy than base camp for the first 7 days
  Steeper and more challenging passes than Everest Base Camp
  Breathtaking Gokyo Lakes
  Different approach to Everest base camp
  Dramatically contrasting scenery and more of a circuit trek
Everest Gokyo Lakes Trek Itinerary
 23 day tour
  Start point is from Pokhara
  Altitude of 5360m
  Very remote with few permanent settlements
  Extended and strenuous trek
  Challenging mountain passes
  Lots of snow and ice sections
  Dramatically contrasting scenery
Dhaulagiri Trek Itinerary
 10 day tour
  Start point is from Pokhara
  Altitude of 3200m
  Treks along a well populated route
  Expect steep sections and lots of stairs
  Wonderful variation of scenery, forests and mountain views
  Trek is in part of the Annapurna region
  Accommodation is in lodges
Poon Hill Trek Itinerary
10 day tour
  Start point is from Kathmandu and Syabru Beshi
  Altitude of 3300m
  Expect steep sections and long days
  Gives you a great insight into the local cultural of the Tamang people
  Wonderful variation of scenery, forests and mountain views
  Trek is in part of the Langtang Region
  Accommodation is a combination of home stays and lodges
Tamang Cultural Trek Itinerary

Trekking Peaks in Nepal
These two peaks are called trekking peaks. Unfortunately, this has led many to believe that there is no difficulty involved. This is not the case. Anything involving the use of ropes, crampons, climbing gear, climbing skill, snow gullies etc can be difficult, even if it is just for one day.

Mera Peak is the highest trekking peak in Nepal at 6654m. Island Peak is slightly lower at 6160m.

If you are looking at something tougher than a standard trek and are keen to try adding a peak, these are good options.

Island Peak Itinerary Mera Peak Itinerary


Other treks nearby
 In Tibet there are options such as Mt Kailash, the Kharta Valley Trek or Everest Advanced Base Camp Trek.  In Bhutan, there is everything from the Laya Ghasa Trek or Dagala Lakes, to the long and difficult Snowman Trek